Giving Thanks Is Good for Your Health

by Dr. Julian Whitaker
Filed Under: Mood & Memory, General Health
Last Reviewed 02/06/2014

Today is one of my favorite holidays of the year. I love a good turkey meal, sharing the day with friends and family, and rooting for my favorite football teams. Plus, we have a long-standing tradition of going around the table and taking time for each person to name one thing they’re grateful for.

The responses are always diverse. Some people are thankful for their family and friends, God, their health, or the opportunity to live in this country. The grandchildren often name their parents, friends, and even their pets (and sometimes a favorite toy) as things they’re grateful for.

Not only does gratefulness exemplify the true meaning of Thanksgiving, it instantly improves your well-being. No matter what shape you’re in, a sense of gratitude will make you feel better. I am convinced that no one can achieve optimum health without a heavy dose of thankfulness for the positive things in life.

I am also convinced that the practice of feeling and articulating gratitude substantially increases happiness. Each year at Thanksgiving, we take stock of our blessings—but all too quickly we go back to the hustle and bustle of everyday life. I suggest you take time out each and every day to recognize and honor the many gifts you enjoy.

From my family to yours, best wishes for a happy Thanksgiving!

Now it’s your turn: What is one thing you’re grateful for?

You May Also Be Interested In:

Enjoy What You've Just Read?

Get it delivered to your inbox! Signup for E-News and you'll get great content like you've just read along with other great tips and guides from Dr. Whitaker!

blog comments powered by Disqus